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Class Progress
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Chapter Listing

Treatment of Dementia - DEMO

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Medication:  Alzheimer’s disease medication, does it help?  Not every drug works the same for every individual, and reactions to the medications may vary.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is concerned about early-onset dementia.  It has approved a number of Alzheimer’s medications and memory drugs for the treatment of memory problems.  These medications have been approved for the treatment of dementia and Alzheimer's disease and are particularly helpful for early-onset dementia.  All medications have the potential of side effects.  It is important to consult a physician knowledgeable about the use of these medications.  As always, it is important to communicate with your prescriber the effects of any medication, including those used to treat memory loss.

Tragically, these approved medications do not prevent or stop the disease. At this juncture there is no known treatment that will prevent or stop the progression of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.

These medications can sometimes slow the devastating effects of early-onset dementia.  Dementia medications can be helpful for memory loss and confusion that accompanies the progression of the disease, a benefit not only for the victim of these memory disorders but also family and caregivers.

IMPORTANT:  It is essential that medical personnel and family members of those diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease are aware of and knowledgeable about the medications the patient is taking, including the desired effects and side effects of the medications.  Given the memory loss and other cognitive deficits experienced with Alzheimer's disease, family members can serve as a vital line of communication between the physicians prescribing the medication, pharmacists filling the prescriptions, and other medical personnel and caregivers.  It is helpful when family members are knowledgeable about the medications the patient is taking, in order to effectively advocate for their loved one. 
Q: [Cognitive] - Behaviors that place primary emphasis on mental or intellectual processes
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