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Class Progress
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Chapter Listing

Social Media Rules for Nurses and Healthcare Providers - DEMO

Preview

Chapter 1: Privacy & Security Regulations and Internet Challenges

Social Media Rules for Nurses and Healthcare Providers

Course Description:

Even if your employer is following patient privacy rules, staff can create big problems by irresponsibly taking photos of patients, and worse yet, sharing them on social media.

Earlier this year, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) released survey findings, indicating 48% of responding nursing boards (33 in total) faced social media challenges. In some cases, complaints related to images of wounds and procedures photographed on personal phones and then shared.

Think of the senselessness, not to mention the consequences of a case reported recently by USA Today. A New York nurse took photos of an unconscious patient’s penis, and the shared the photos with co-workers. The nurse initially faced a felony charge, but agreed to give up her nursing license for a reduced sentence. Nursing homes are particularly ripe for similar types of abuses involving nakedness, as ProPublica has reported.

Education can:

  • Prevent violations of patient rights
  • Create a culture of vigilance within an organization
  • Save healthcare providers the cost of fines and settlements, often in 7 figures 
  • Prevent the loss of your license and employment

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define Protected Health Information (PHI).
  2. Identify the kind of daily carelessness that threatens PHI.
  3. State the role of staff in protecting PHI.
  4. Recognize obvious risks that should be reported to appropriate supervisors.
  5. List 3 personal responsibilities that contribute to a culture of vigilance in protecting PHI.

Curriculum:

Chapter 1: Privacy & Security Regulations and Internet Challenges

Chapter 2: Big Enemies in Carelessness & Neglect

Chapter 3: Put Safeguards in Place

Chapter 4: Protecting Patient Information

Chapter 5:Conclusion

Chapter 6:Sources

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