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Class Progress
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Chapter Listing

Code of Ethics for Nurses in a Correctional Setting: Respect for Human Dignity - DEMO

Preview

Chapter 1: Professional Nursing Values and the Code for Nurses

Ethical nursing practice can be challenging in any health care setting. This is especially true in a jail or prison where patients are also prisoners or detained for probable cause in a crime. The nature of caring must shift to meet the need of the patient population and environment in correctional nursing practice. The Code of Ethics for Nurses provides a basis for navigating the murky waters of nursing practice in a correctional setting. This course uses practical case examples to apply the first provision of the Code of Ethics for Nurses to correctional practice.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, the participant should be able to:

  • Describe the professional nursing values that underlie the Code for Nurses
  • Outline ways to respect human dignity and patient relationship when working with incarcerated patients
  • Describe approaches to manage health problems and seek self-determination for incarcerated patients
  • Improve your relationship with work colleagues

Curriculum:

Chapter 1: Professional Nursing Values and the Code for Nurses

  • The Nightingale Pledge
  • A Code for Nurses
  • Professional Values embedded in the Code
  • Duty to Self and Others

Chapter 2: Respect for Human Dignity and Patient Relationship

  • Case Study #1 – Human Dignity
  • Acknowledge Your Feelings
  • Work Your Core
  • Know the Rules
  • What Does the Patient Need?
  • Case Study #2 – Patient Relationship
  • More than the Tasks
  • Three Choices
  • How to Show You Care in Corrections
  • More about Caring in Correctional Practice

Chapter 3: The Nature of Health Problems and the Right to Self-Determination

  • Case #3 – The Nature of Health Problems
  • Gift Exchange
  • Shifting Perspective
  • Out of Body Experience
  • Case #4 – Right to Self-Determination
  • The Ethical Principle of Autonomy
  • Autonomy Means Voluntary
  • Autonomy Requires All the Information
  • Self-Determination Can Not Risk the Health of Others
  • Options for Self-Determination

Chapter 4: Relationship with Colleagues

  • Case #5
  • Caring is Not Just for Patients
  • Prevention and Proactivity
  • Relationship Responsibility

Chapter 5: Summary and References

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