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Class Progress
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Chapter Listing

Gamma Globulin

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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION

Antibodies, also known as immunoglobulins, (abbreviated Ig) are gamma globulin proteins that are found in blood or other bodily fluids, and are used by the immune system to identify and neutralize foreign objects, such as bacteria and viruses. The terms antibody and immunoglobulin are often used interchangeably. These proteins are produced by leukocytes in lymph tissue. Immunoglobulin G is one of the five subclasses of immunoglobulin. It is the most abundant immunoglobulin and is equally distributed in blood and in tissue liquids. Approximately 75% of serum immunoglobulins in humans are IgG and this is the predominant immunoglobulin subclass that is included in commercial gamma globulin infusion products. Although there are some immunoglobulin products, called hyperimmune immunoglobulins, especially high in antibodies against certain diseases such as tetanus, varicella, rabies, hepatitis A and B, the products described in this course contain > 95% IgG, which means that IgG is essentially the only immunoglobulin that can effectively be replaced by these products. However, most preparations also contain some IgA and trace amounts of other plasma proteins. All preparations currently available in this country are made from 10,000 to 60,000 units of plasma, which ensures that they contain antibodies against a broad spectrum of infectious agents.

Q: [Bacteria] - Microorganisms that may potentiate disease and infection [Image]
Q: [Antibody] - A gamma globulin protein found in blood or other bodily fluids that is used by the immune system to identify and neutralize foreign objects, such as bacteria and viruses.
Q: [Plasma] - The yellow-colored liquid component of blood, in which blood cells are suspended
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